Plataforma sobre Adaptación al Cambio Climático en España

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Case studies

An increasing number of experiences, initiatives and projects aimed at developing and implementing specific actions to adapt to climate change. In this module you will be able to explore practical cases on adaptation developed in different territories of Spain and implemented by Public Administrations, private sector entities, organisations, and other actors. On the other hand, you will also be able to consult and access the case studies included in the European Climate-ADAPT Platform. Here you can find more information about this functionality and the connection with Climate-ADAPT.
Furthermore, in this publication you can find a selection of adaptation case studies with some of the most representative practices.
Note: The views and documentation provided in the case studies are the sole responsibility of the author(s) of the case studies.

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The NBS URBAN project seeks to integrate nature into urban planning, reinforcing the use of ecosystems and nature together with existing infrastructures in order to locally adapt to climate change in the Basque Country region, using for such purpose a map for their identification

Other Cases studies

During the 1980s and 1990s, the neighbourhood of Augustenborg in Malmö was an area of social and economic decline and was frequently flooded by an overflowing drainage system. Between 1998 and 2002, the area was regenerated.

Stuttgart?s location in a valley basin, its mild climate, low wind speeds, industrial activity and high volume of traffic has made the city highly susceptible to poor air quality.

The city of Antwerp, in order to better understand the problem of heat stress, commissioned the research organization VITO to map the current and future temperatures and thermal comfort in the city.

Bratislava has received funding from ?EEA Grants and Norway Grants? (hereafter called EEA Grants) for an urban climate adaptation project. The project entitled ?Bratislava is preparing for climate change?

In response to climate change, one of Hamburg’s objectives is to become greener, in the city and on the roofs. In this context, Hamburg is the first German city to have developed a comprehensive Green Roof Strategy.

With 5.71 m2/inhabitant in 2019, the city of Basel in Switzerland has the largest area of green roofs per capita in the world (Living roofs and walls from policy to practice, 2019).

The neighbourhood of Augustenborg, during the 1980s and 1990s an area of social and economic decline, was frequently flooded by an overflowing drainage system. Between 1998 and 2002 it was regenerated.

In inner city Berlin, plans for the development of new buildings are subjected to the Berlin Landscape Programme, which includes a regulation requiring a proportion of the area to be left as green space: the Biotope Area Factor (BAF) or BFF (Biotop Flächenfaktor).